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Video Contest: Rumor Has It

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Contest ended

Monday Jun 23, 2014

$1000

Youth Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$200

Word Winner

T-Shirt

Honorable Mention

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Viewer's Choice

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Why you talking t...

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The Cook Off

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Indiscreetly

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Rumor Has It

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Notorious Ball Thief

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Senator Johnson's...

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The Phone Call

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The Box Speculation


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The Definition of...

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Insinuating

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Mr. Notorious

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What's the Word

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Notorious

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The Notorious S.T...

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Meddling is just....

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Notorious: A Thri...

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Slander Definition

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Meddling Bears

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The Dessert Theft

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Project ED- Slander

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Speculate

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Meddling Songs

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Notorious

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Ramish and Slander

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Slander

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Erroneous - Rumor...

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Erroneous

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The Schemer

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The Schemer

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School Rumors!

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Schemer

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rumor has it: sch...

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Don't be the victim

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The Scandal Games

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ERRONEOUS RUMORS

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SPECULATE

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Meddling Done Right

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Slander

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Insinuating

Who doesn’t like a little gossip now and then? I’m talking about dishing dirt, learning secrets, and entertaining all kinds of scandalous news. Some of it might even be true. These words are for any of us who’ve had our dirty laundry hung out for everyone to see or spread any manner of juicy tale about someone else.

Look at the eight words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief to craft a story that conveys the word’s definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you chose. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these eight words: schemer, indiscreetly, erroneous, slander, meddling, speculate, insinuatingly, notorious.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word, it’s part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

Image Credit: Allevinati/iStockphoto

1) Schemer (noun) – someone who makes sneaky and dishonest plans

So here’s the plan…

Thought starter: Have you ever wanted something so badly you cheated to get it? If so, you acted like a schemer. Make a one-minute video about a clever schemer who almost gets away with a sneaky plan, but finds herself tricked instead.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word schemer to refer to someone who hatches dishonest plans. A schemer might leave school pretending he’s sick, but actually go to the movies.

2) Indiscreetly (adverb) – to do something without tact or good judgment

Out in the open

Thought starter: Have you ever acted without thinking about the consequences? People may have said you were acting indiscreetly. Make a one-minute video about someone acting carelessly or indiscreetly, and everyone knows it except him!

Pro-tip: Writers use the word indiscreetly when describing an action that is obvious, or too revealing. If someone indiscreetly passes a secret note in class, they might fold it into a paper airplane to sail it across the room, and get caught by the teacher.

3) Erroneous (adjective) – describes wrong or incorrect information

Thought starter: People say crazy things. Anyone who’s ever been the subject of an erroneous rumor will tell you, it’s no fun when others invent untrue stories about you. Make a one-minute video about an erroneous rumor that spreads, and gets bigger and more untrue with each telling.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word erroneous to describe a false statement or rumor. A group of students might start an erroneous rumor that their gym teacher is actually a werewolf.

4) Slander (noun) – damaging lies

Talkin’ trash

Thought starter: Has someone ever said something hurtful and untrue about you? This is a form of slander, and it can do a number on your image. Make a one-minute video of someone who is the victim of slander, and makes great efforts to clear his name.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word slander when talking about lies that damage a person’s reputation. It would be slander to tell people that your next door neighbor is a bank robber if it isn’t factually proven.

5) Meddling (verb) – interfering in someone else’s business

All up in my business

Thought starter: Do you like to get involved in other people’s problems? If you insert yourself into someone’s affairs uninvited, you are meddling. Make a one-minute video about someone who makes a problem bigger by meddling in an argument between two people.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word meddling when talking about involving oneself in someone else’s private affairs. If you join an argument between two friends uninvited, you are meddling.

6) Speculate (verb) – to guess about something without firm evidence

Going with your gut

Thought starter: Have you ever had to guess about something important? Maybe you had to speculate on the grade you expected to receive immediately after taking a big test. Make a one-minute video about someone who tries to speculate on the answer to a major issue.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word speculate to describe the action of guessing about something you don’t really know. You might speculate about the contents of a wrapped gift.

7) Insinuating (verb) – suggesting or hinting

Catch my drift?

Thought starter: Ever tried to get a point across without actually coming out and saying it? When you talk around a subject instead of saying it outright, you’re insinuating something. For example, you might be insinuating that your friend is a cheapskate when you say to her, “I’m pretty sure I picked up the check last time.”

Make a one-minute video about someone who is insinuating that his smelly friend needs a bath.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word insinuating to describe the action of hinting at something.

You might be insinuating that someone is too loud when you tell him politely, “Your voice really carries.”

8) Notorious (adjective) – famous for bad behavior

Loves to be hated

Thought starter: If you are a notorious flirt, girls might keep their boyfriends away from you. Make a one-minute video about the arrival of someone notorious who turns out not so bad.


Pro-tip: Writers use the word notorious to describe someone whose bad behavior is well known. A reality TV star known for her terrible temper could be described as notorious.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • April 28, 2014 – Contest opens
  • May 26, 2014 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • June 9, 2014 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • June 23, 2014 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

Official Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

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