Join our
Mailing List

Video Contest: Toot Your Own Horn

status
closedClose image
Video Contest: Toot Your Own Horn!

0

days left

Contest ended

Monday Jul 07, 2014

$1000

Youth Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$200

Word Winner

T-Shirt

Honorable Mention

T-Shirt

Viewer's Choice

Youth Grand Prize

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

Gloat: the Vocab ...

Adult Grand Prize

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

Gaudy Grayson

Word Winner

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

The Glorified Truth

Word Winner

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

The High Score

Word Winner

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

A woman of emine...

Word Winner

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

Magnanimous: Proj...

Word Winner

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

PRODIGIOUS

Honorable Mention

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

Peter the Goat

Honorable Mention

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

The Gaudy Rap

Viewer's Choice

Winner banner title
Mqdefault

Definition: Gloat


Mqdefault

LAUD/DaeshaM/MyVideo

Mqdefault

G(l)oat

Mqdefault

Prodigious

Mqdefault

A Prodigious Juggler

Mqdefault

My Prodigious Pot...

Mqdefault

Awards night!

Mqdefault

Poker Night

Mqdefault

Gloating At The O...

Mqdefault

A Girl Called Emi...

Mqdefault

The word Eminence...

Mqdefault

Gloat

Mqdefault

Newscast (Laud)

478259029 200x150

Prodigious Dancer

Mqdefault

Eminence

Mqdefault

Terrifying necklace

Mqdefault

Guy Code #1 - "Ga...

Mqdefault

Engaged To Ms. Gloat

Mqdefault

Prodigious Peter'...

Mqdefault

Sore-Winner

Mqdefault

Gloating...with a...

Mqdefault

The Card Tower

Mqdefault

A Note on Gloat

Mqdefault

Gloatmate

Mqdefault

beat box

Mqdefault

Bonified Glorifie...

Mqdefault

Gaudy

Mqdefault

Glorious Failure

Mqdefault

Model Gets a Gaud...

Mqdefault

Gaudy

Mqdefault

Wooden Sword

Mqdefault

Project ED - Gloat

Mqdefault

Eminence in Rolle...

Mqdefault

The Monotonous Da...

Mqdefault

Generosity

Mqdefault

Thanks for the Laud

Mqdefault

Nobody likes Gloa...

Mqdefault

Gloating!

Mqdefault

Love Birds

Mqdefault

Redefining Prodig...

Mqdefault

Toot Your Own Hor...

Mqdefault

Toot Your Own Hor...

Mqdefault

Basketball Gloating

477163147 200x150

Eminence in One M...

Mqdefault

Lottery Magnamity

477230854 200x150

"Ostentation" - A...

Mqdefault

The meaning of th...

Mqdefault

Gloating Boy

Mqdefault

WINNER'S GLOAT

Mqdefault

Vickie Adams/Fire...

Mqdefault

Eminence by Ashly...

Mqdefault

Gloating

Mqdefault

Ostentation turns...

476435015 200x150

ProjectEd Video C...

Mqdefault

How to be a Winner

Mqdefault

Gaudy Girls

Mqdefault

imagined glorific...

Ever believed you were the best at something? Loved to see your face in the mirror? Felt like the most awesome thing since sliced bread? We all have moments when we toot our own horns and strut down the street. But watch out, too many of these self-congratulatory moments might give you a permanently enlarged head. A little self-confidence goes a long way, but be careful.

Look at the eight words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief to craft a story that conveys the word’s definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you’ve chosen. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these eight words: gloat, glorified, laud, ostentation, gaudy, eminence, magnanimous, prodigious.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word, its part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

1. Gloat (verb) – brag in an offensive manner

Thought starter: Are you a sore-winner? If you ever beat someone in a challenge and rubbed it in his or her face, you are gloating about your victory. Make a one minute video about someone who gloats about being right, only to get an unexpected punishment.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word gloat when talking about the action of dwelling in success or victory. Someone who wins a game might gloat about their victory to their friends.

2. Glorified (participle) - celebrated

Thought starter: Have you ever made a big deal over something that maybe didn’t deserve it? For example, you may have had a modest success but described it in a glorified manner when telling your friends. Make a one minute video about a glorified victory that turns out to be pretty ho-hum.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word glorified when talking about the action of aggressively celebrating something. A very popular video game might be said to have glorified violence.

3. Laud (verb) – praise abundantly

Thought starter: Ever been to an awards ceremony? The people who are publicly given trophies and ribbons are lauded for their success. Make a one minute video about someone who is lauded for a great accomplishment.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word laud when talking about the action of publicly awarding and complimenting someone for something. A well-reviewed writer might be described as lauded.

4. Ostentation (noun) – tasteless display to impress or attract attention

Thought starter: Nobody likes show-offs, especially those who make a big show of their wealth. A giant diamond pinky ring would be an ostentation, or tasteless display of wealth and luxury. Make a short video about someone with a flare for ostentation and the various reactions of his friends.

Pro-tip: Writers often use the word ostentation when referring to a tacky display of wealth. Wearing a dinner jacket made entirely out of spun gold would be a spectacular (and heavy) example of ostentation.

5. Gaudy (adjective) – showy to the point of being tasteless

Thought starter: Do you know anyone with flashy and tacky taste? This gaudy sensibility might cause someone to wear fluorescent pants or bright multicolor hair. Make a short video about a plain-dresser who gets a very gaudy makeover.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word gaudy when referring to something that attempts to be fashionable, but ends up being hard on the eyes. A bright red hat covered with rhinestones would be a gaudy piece of clothing.

6. Eminence (noun) - reputation of greatness in a specific field

Better than all the rest

Thought starter: Who do you admire? Most of us admire someone who has achieved a position of eminence, or a condition of being well-known and successful. Make a fictional documentary about someone who achieves a state of eminence after years of hard work and focus.

Pro-tip: Writers often use the word eminence when referring to someone who has achieved the highest public and social honors. A very well respected judge, like a member of the Supreme Court, might be referred to as Her Eminence.

7. Magnanimous (adjective) – very kind and generous, especially with someone less fortunate

Thought starter: Are you a good sport? Someone who wins gracefully (the opposite of a sore loser) might make an effort to appear magnanimousby hugging and comforting a losing competitor? Make a short video about someone who makes a huge effort to appear magnanimous after winning the lottery.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word magnanimous to describe someone who shows kindness to someone in a weaker position. Someone who wins an Academy Award might say that his co-nominees deserved the award more, in a magnanimous display.

8. Prodigious (adjective) - impressively great in extent, size or degree

Thought starter: Have you ever seen a demonstration of talent that left you in awe? For example, a fine violinist’s prodigious ability to play his instrument might make your jaw drop. Make a one minute video of a very normal person who suddenly displays a prodigious talent.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word prodigious to describe something of impressive size. A huge mine might produce a prodigious amount of copper.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • April 28, 2014 – Contest opens
  • May 26, 2014 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • June 9, 2014 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • June 23, 2014 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

Official Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

Vocabulary Tips

Video Production Tips

Audio Tips

Lighting Tips

Video Compression

Close modal

Sign Up

Please enter your date of birth:
Enter
Sorry, you must be 13 years or older to participate.

Sign up for the Project ED Newsletter

Enter your name to get email updates on current and upcoming contests from Project ED.

Password Recovery

Close modal

Log In

Close modal

Resend Unlock Instructions

Close modal

Resend Email Confirmation Instructions

Close modal