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Independent & Dependent Clauses

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Video Contest:  Independent & Dependent Clauses

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Contest ended

Monday Aug 25, 2014

$1000

Youth Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$200

Finalist

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Honorable Mention

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Viewers Choice

Youth Grand Prize

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Independent Lenny

Finalist

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Clauses

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Clauses with Shak...

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Independent / Dep...

Honorable Mention

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The Difference

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In this contest, we need your help identifying clauses. No, we don’t mean the family that lives in the North Pole! We’re talking about two important parts of grammar that help us communicate effectively. In this contest, you’ll create a one-minute video that explains the difference between the two types of clauses: independent clauses and dependent clauses.

A clause is a part of a sentence.

  • An Independent Clause has a subject, predicate, and expresses a complete idea. In other words, it forms a complete sentence.
    • For example: “I liked scary stories.”
  • A Dependent Clause has a subject and a predicate, but depends on another clause to express a complete idea. In other words, it does not form a complete sentence without the other clause.
    • For example, “When I was younger, I liked scary stories.”

For more examples and information about independent and dependent clauses, click the Resources tab.

Now that you know all about independent and dependent clauses, we want you to create a one-minute video that creatively explains the difference between the two!

Thought Starters:

  • “We finish each other’s … sandwiches!” How would an Independent Clause and Dependent Clause act around each other if they were real-life people? Make a video where you personify the clauses. They might have a hard time understanding each other. Perhaps the dependent clause is clingy and hard to understand because it can’t finish a complete thought. Maybe the independent clause just wants to be left alone.
  • Welcome to another show of “Is It Complete?!” Make a video about a wacky game show where various contestants compete for the top prize by identifying independent and dependent clauses.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than one-minute, you must:

  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the difference between independent and dependent clauses.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • June 30, 2014 – Contest opens
  • July 28, 2014 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • August 11, 2014 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • On or around August 25, 2014 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

In this contest we will be offering one adult grand prize, one youth grand prize, three finalist prizes, one honorable mention prizes, and one viewers choice prizes. All prizes amounts are in USD where applicable.

Official Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

More on Clauses

A clause is a part of a sentence. The official definitions follow, but think of an independent clause as a part of a sentence that can stand on its own.

Dependent clauses are like unfinished thoughts. They keep you hanging and begging for a “who” or “what.” They’re so needy and dependent!

Independent Clause

An independent clause has a subject, predicate, and expresses a complete idea.

Dependent Clause

A dependent clause has a subject and a predicate, but depends on another clause to express a complete idea.

Dependent Markers

Words that begin dependent clauses are called dependent markers.

Dependent markers can show:


Time:

once, after, before, since, when, while, as

Place:

where, wherever

Manner:

how, however, as, as if, as though

Relation:

that, which, who, whom

Contrast:

but, although, even though, though, whereas, while, yet

Cause:

as, because, since, so that

Condition:

if, then, whether, unless

Examples:

When I was younger, I liked scary stories.

Because the old man has a hideous eye, the narrator plans to murder him.

After examining the corpse, he confirmed the old man was dead.

The police would have left him alone if he hadn’t admitted his guilt.

Here are some example sentences from a lesson in our Poe unit.

Sentences starting with dependent clauses:

  1. As the floorboards groaned, I hid under the covers.
  2. During the fierce storm, my dog ran to the basement.
  3. After turning on his flashlight, Tobey climbed up the stairs.
  4. Because it was so dark, Ling missed the puddle.
  5. When thunder rumbled overhead, Edgar shuddered.

Here the same sentences are “flipped” so that they start with independent clauses. Notice that when the sentence starts with an independent clause, we usually omit the comma.

  1. I hid under the covers as the floorboards groaned.
  2. My dog ran to the basement during the fierce storm.
  3. Tobey climbed up the stairs after turning on his flashlight.
  4. Ling missed the puddle because it was so dark.
  5. Edgar shuddered when thunder rumbled overhead.

Additional Resources (Dependent and Independent Clauses)

Purdue’s Online Writing Lab:

owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/598/01

Grammar Girl (refer to the sections on compound and complex sentences):

www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/complex-compound-sentences

Clauses: The Essential Building Blocks:

grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/clauses.htm

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