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Who's in Your Neighborhood

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Video Contest: Who's in Your Neighborhood

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Contest ended

Monday Sep 08, 2014

$1000

Student Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$200

Word Winner

T-Shirt

Honorable Mention

T-Shirt

Viewer's Choice

Student Grand Prize

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"Vagabond" - Orig...

Adult Grand Prize

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Marshmallow Martyr

Word Winner

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Definition: Paupers

Word Winner

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Pariah: Who peed ...

Word Winner

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Ghost Rhider Flem...

Word Winner

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I'm a Philosopher!

Honorable Mention

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The Vagabond and ...

Honorable Mention

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He Prefers Eccentric

Viewer's Choice

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Eccentric Interve...


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Philosopher

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Eccentric Laddergolf

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What is a Philoso...

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Roadside Conversion

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Martyr Girls

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Eccentric

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Philosopher

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Sacri-fish-al: A ...

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WORD Force: Eccen...

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Inspirational

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Her Own Dress Code

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Who is in your ne...

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Vagabond: A Visua...

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I'm a pauper: mus...

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Eccentric

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Vagabonds

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The thinking man

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Mira the Adherent

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My ECCENTRIC neig...

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Eccentric

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Philosopher

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Bob the Philosopher

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Different.I.Am.

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Eccentric Max

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Definition: Pariah

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The "Philosopher"

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The Neighborhood ...

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The Philosopher

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Peter The Pariah ...

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Top Hats and Rain...

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being yourself be...

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Dorito and Pickle...

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My Movie Vegabond

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Vagabond

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Eccentric

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Vagabonds

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Take the Path Les...

It takes all different kinds of people to make up a neighborhood — whether that’s a nation, a city, or society. Not every community has every kind of person in it … but if you look carefully, you might find that people are more varied than you think!

Look at the eight words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief and craft a story that conveys it. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you choose. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these eight words: eccentric, martyr, paupers, contemporaries, adherent, pariah, philosopher, vagabonds.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word, its part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

1. Eccentric (adjective) – different from the norm

Thought starter: Where’s the fun when everyone acts the same? Eccentric people can’t or won’t conform, even if their difference causes problems. Someone who always uses an umbrella indoors is eccentric, and so is someone who always asks awkward questions. Make a short video about someone who combines oddness and bravery.

Pro tip: Writers use the word eccentric to indicate someone’s differences of habit or mind-set or lifestyle. The eccentric owner of the thrift store, with his old silk scarves and bright plastic shoes, really taught me how to dress.

2. Martyr (noun) – someone who suffers or sacrifices him- or herself for a specific reason

Thought starter: Maybe you’ve heard stories of religious or political heroes who “died for the cause.” But calling someone a martyr doesn’t always imply a bloody end! More likely, it means that someone devotes great energy to a project and suffers for it, but lives. Make a short video about an extreme sacrifice for an unlikely cause.

Pro tip: Writers sometimes use the word martyr in a slightly humorous way, about people who treat their struggles dramatically. Mrs. Vora, a martyr for the cause of animal control, was proud to displayher newest scratches from the stray cats she trapped in her backyard.

3. Paupers (noun) – poor people

Thought starter: Who are the most unprotected people you can think of? Many of today’s prisoners, refugees, homeless, and migrant workers would have been called paupers a century or two ago. Make a short video about someone who has no riches, property, or power to soften the hard blows of life.

Pro tip: Writers use the word paupers when they are talking about poor people in past eras, or when they want a sarcastic or ironic tone. We felt like modern-day paupers at a poorhouse when our school didn’t have enough textbooks or pencils for all the children.

4. Contemporaries (noun) – people of the same age

Thought starter: Do you see people of the same age hanging out together in your neighborhood? Elders might chat with their contemporaries on park benches, or teenagers might gather on a stoop or a street corner. Make a short video that shows a group of contemporaries spending time with each other.

Pro tip: Writers often use the word contemporaries to describe an age-group or a generation; this bond is looser than family or friendship, but still important to how people think of themselves. While most of my contemporaries rough-housed on the playground, I sat under my favorite tree and read a book.

5. Adherent (noun) – follower

Thought starter: Do you know someone who tries hard to obey a special set of rules, or who follows a leader with a strong personality? An adherent like this often finds a sense of safety or rightness by following. Make a short video about a follower tempted to stop following.

Pro tip: Writers mostly use the word adherent to describe a very devoted or determined follower. Anisa became a strict adherent to vegetarianism, despite working in her family’s butcher shop.

6. Pariah (noun) – outcast

Thought starter: Just as popular people are included and welcomed by their peers, unpopular people are ignored or even rejected. The most unpopular person of all might be called a pariah. This word was originally used to describe a group of people in South India who were forced to do filthy jobs, and then despised as a result. Others use the word to describe social outcasts in general. Make a short video about the sadness that comes when people choose to create outcasts.

Pro tip: Writers who use the word pariah want to show how a person is the “lowest of the low,” someone that “respectable” people don’t even want to touch. Because she took care of homeless people dying from AIDS, the doctor became as much of a pariah in our small town as her patients were; soon she had to move away. An unpopular kid at school may melodramatically describe herself as a social pariah.

7. Philosopher (noun) – thinker

Thought starter: Colleges and monasteries are full of people who want to get away from the world and think. But other philosophers keep living regular lives. Cab drivers, hair stylists, and janitors are often depicted as philosophers. Make a short video about a thinker dealing with everyday life.

Pro tip: Writers use the word philosopher to describe someone who likes to explore a thought from all angles, just for the pleasure of it. My uncle was a street-corner philosopher, always playing chess in the park and arguing about the meaning of life with strangers.

8. Vagabonds (noun) – homeless wanderers

Thought starter: Did you ever notice hitch hikers on the side of the road, with everything they owned in big backpacks? Vagabonds might wander in search of work, or for adventure, or to learn about the world. Some vagabonds travel with circuses or music shows. Make a short video about vagabonds passing through a town.


Pro tip: Writers use the word vagabonds to describe people on the move, with few possessions, and no fixed destination. The teenage vagabonds sprawl on the sidewalk with their dogs, guitars, and backpacks.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • August 11, 2014 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • August 25, 2014 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • On or Around September 8, 2014 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

In this contest we will be offering one adult grand prize, one youth grand prize, six finalist prizes, two honorable mention prizes, and one viewers choice prizes. All prizes amounts are in USD where applicable.

Official Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

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