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$1000 Video Contest Expert Opinions

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Contest ended

Monday Oct 06, 2014

$1000

Student Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$200

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Word Winner

T-Shirt

Honorable Mention

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Quack: The Essay

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Adam, the NBI Agnet

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Dr. Quack

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The Game

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Connoisseurship C...

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Definition: Scholar

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To Practice Impos...

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The Croissant Con...

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Run Inducer

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Divinity

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Induced


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QuackMan

Who do you call when you want the last word on a subject? You can learn a lot from asking a brain surgeon about brain surgery, a marine biologist about whales, or taking piano lessons from a master pianist. Of course, sometimes people who claim to be experts are really just fakers. Take a look at these words and see if you can tell the difference between the pros and the poseurs.

Look at the nine words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief to craft a story that conveys the word’s definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you’ve chosen. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these nine words or phrases: connoisseurship, induced, virtuoso, to practice imposture, quack, divining, prodigy, strategist, and scholar.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word or phrase, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word or phrase, its part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

1. Connoisseurship (noun) – special knowledge

Thought starter: Do you know everything there is to know about a certain subject, like French food or the batting averages of baseball players? If so, you have connoisseurship in this area. Create a one-minute video showing your connoisseurship about topic you are passionate about.

Pro-tip: Writers use connoisseurship to describe having in-depth expertise about a specialized topic. Stamp collectors are known for their connoisseurship of postage stamps.

2. Induced (verb) – led on to some action, condition, belief, etc.; prevailed on; persuaded

Thought starter: Are people powerless to resist your influence? Have you ever convinced a friend to try something new? If so, you induced them to take a chance. Make a short video about the time you induced a friend to go on an adventure.

Pro-tip: Writers use induced to describe the action of talking someone into doing something, especially when they would not have otherwise done it. The physicist induced other scientists to take her theory seriously by presenting her research.

3. Virtuoso (noun) – a person displaying great technical skill in some fine art

Thought starter: Does painting, playing an instrument, or drawing come naturally to you? If you have always been very good at something, you are a virtuoso. Make a one-minute video about a young virtuoso wowing an audience with their enormous talent.

Pro-tip: Writers use virtuoso to describe someone who is incredibly gifted, particularly in the arts. A virtuoso violinist might have begun playing when he was as young as four years old.

4. To practice imposture (phrase) – to pretend to be someone you’re not

Thought starter: Hollywood films are filled with bad guys who act like they are someone else. These sneaky characters practice imposture in order to fool people and get what they want. Make a short video about how your favorite fictional trickster practices imposture.

Pro-tip: Writers use the phrase to practice imposture to describe people who claim to be someone they’re not. The fugitive was forced to practice imposture while on the run from the cops.

5. quack (noun) – any person who pretends to have knowledge or skill that he or she does not have in a particular field; a charlatan

Thought starter: Have you ever been taken in by someone claiming to be an authority on a subject, only to find they had no idea what they were talking about? Were you angry when you found out this person was a fraud, or quack? Make a short video about the time you were fooled by a quack.

Pro-tip: Writers use quack to describe people who pretend to be experts, but actually have little or no knowledge about a subject. A doctor who is a quack might take your money, but his medicines won’t help you get well.

6. divine (verb) - to guess; conjecture; to find out by intuition

Thought starter: Do you have great intuition? Do your predictions often come true? If so, you have a gift for divining. Make a video about a magician divining her audience’s thoughts.

Pro-tip: Writers use divining to describe the act of guessing, often with the suggestion of the supernatural. A psychic might use his powers of divining to locate a missing person.

7. Prodigy (noun) – a person, thing, or act so extraordinary as to inspire wonder; specifically, a child of highly unusual talent or genius

Thought starter: Have you ever met someone who is especially gifted? Someone who has talent and skills well beyond their years? If so, that person is called a prodigy. Make a one-minute video about a child prodigy with an unusual and unexpected talent.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word prodigy to describe someone who is especially skilled or brilliant. They often use this word to describe a child or young person with enormous talent and ability. Mozart was a famous child prodigy, mastering musical composition at a very young age.

8. Strategist (noun) – one using strategy; one skilled in strategy

Thought starter: Do you carefully consider all the options before deciding on a course of action? Do you come up with a plan of attack before you begin a task? If so, you are a strategist. Make a one-minute video about the process of a strategist preparing to take an important action.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word strategist to describe a person who is especially good at planning and strategy. The mayor is an expert strategist and often carefully plans her next move before she acts.

9. Scholar (noun) – a learned person; a specialist in a particular branch of learning, esp. in the humanities

Thought starter: Do you know a lot about history, music, or literature? Have you spent time researching, reading, and learning about a certain subject? If so, you are a scholar. Make a one-minute video about your quest to become a scholar of a certain subject.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word scholar to describe a person who has learned a lot about a particular subject. The professor is a well-known scholar of the history of Mexico.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • July 23, 2014 – Contest opens
  • August 25, 2014 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • September 9, 2014 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • On or around October 6, 2014 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

In this contest we will be offering one adult grand prize, one youth grand prize, seven finalist prizes, two honorable mention prizes, and one viewers choice prizes. All prizes amounts are in USD where applicable.

Official Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

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