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Still Waters Run Deep

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Still Waters Run Deep Vocabulary Video Contest

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Contest ended

Monday Jan 26, 2015

$1000

Youth Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$200

Viewer's Choice

$200

Word Winner

Youth Grand Prize

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Naïveté - The Idi...

Adult Grand Prize

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Cookies!

Viewer's Choice

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The Cookie

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Diffidence at the...

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The Prudent Knight

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Juggling and Diff...

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Discretion

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The Adventures of...

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A Prudish Patron


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CupCakes and Kiss...

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The Lion and the ...

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Modest

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Overly Modest Sup...

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Definition of Pru...

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Muffin Temperance

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An An...tic Adven...

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Modest Mozart

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The King of Pie h...

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Forever Orphan

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Arrington Word of...

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A ProjectEd Film ...

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Prudish Prudence

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Modesty to a T

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Diffidence A New ...

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Tale Of the Modes...

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A Modest Superhero

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Temperance-Nick W...

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Modest by Matt Siley

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The Copy Predicament

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"Temperance"

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Naïveté

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A Most Modest Man

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Short Temperance

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Adventures of the...

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Prudish

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Overcoming Diffid...

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Naïveté

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Robot Meets the M...

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A date with modesty

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Temperance

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Naïveté Muffins

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Modesty Wins

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Discretion

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Temperance

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Temperance and Ch...

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The Prudish Man W...

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as he seen himself

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Modest: Without v...

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Too Prudish for P...

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Diffidence

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Modest

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Who are those quiet types standing at the edges of crowds? The shy ones who listen but don’t talk much, who might smile but don’t get rowdy? The old saying “still waters run deep” means that nobody can see what’s going on deep inside a quiet person. These mysterious figures don’t tell you everything they know. There are as many ways and as many reasons to stand back as there are to jump into the party.

Look at the eight words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief to craft a story that conveys the word’s definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you chose. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these eight words: modest, diffidence, prudish, austere, temperance, prudence, naïveté, and discretion.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word, its part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

1. Modest (adjective) – humble

Thought starter: Some people boast and brag about their deeds, while other people are modest. “Oh, it was nothing!” says the modest person who just saved the city, or “Anyone would have done the same.” Instead of showing off or grabbing attention, someone modest points out the contributions of others. Make a short video about a modest superhero or supervillain.

Pro tip: Writers use the word modest to show some approval or admiration for a person’s lack of pride. A modest person comes across as confident and secure, with nothing to prove.

2. Diffidence (noun) – distrust in oneself that causes shyness

Thought starter: Have you ever felt bashful and unsure in a room full of strangers? Diffidence describes the kind of shyness that comes from uncertainty about your own abilities or the role you are supposed to play. Diffidence can make you hesitate and stay quiet. Make a short video that shows someone laying aside his diffidence as he makes a new friend.

Pro tip: Writers use the word diffidence to express the opposite of confidence. A little bit of diffidence is healthy, because it’s good to question yourself; but too much diffidence is paralyzing.

3. Prudish (adjective) – overly prim and proper

Thought starter: How do you deal with a statue of a nude person in a museum? If you are prudish, you might cover its nakedness with a cloth, or just refuse to look at it. Prudish people are easily shocked by skimpy clothes and wild behavior. Make a short video about a group of prudish people scandalized by mild activities at a children’s birthday party.

Pro tip: Writers use the word prudish when they think a person’s concerns about modesty or good behavior are ridiculous, fearful, or outdated — or all three! Prudish gives the impression that someone is overreacting to something normal or natural.

4. Austere (adjective) – stern

Thought starter: Do you know anyone who is too severe and stern to approach? Such an austere person doesn’t chat and laugh with neighbors, or give you a friendly hug. Instead, she speaks harsh words and makes harsh judgments. Make a short video about an austere person who is just a strict with himself as with others.

Pro tip: Writers also use the word austere to describe harsh lands, bitter fruits, strict religions, and bare rooms. Anything with pleasure, comfort, or luxury stripped away could be called austere.

5. Temperance (noun) – having self-control; not drinking alcohol

Thought starter: Have you ever struggled to keep control of your anger, impatience, or appetite? Temperance is the practice of controlling your passions and desires, instead of indulging them. Usually, temperance is presented as part of a righteous or spiritual path. Make a short video that shows temperance in action when someone is tempted or provoked.

Pro tip: Writers occasionally use temperance to mean a particular kind of self-control: not drinking alcohol. This specialized meaning comes from the religious “temperance movements” that formed in the 1800s and tried to discourage or outlaw alcohol use.

6. Prudence (noun) – being sensible and cautious

Thought starter: Do you know someone who tends to make good practical decisions and stay out of trouble? Someone who demonstrates prudence might turn down a risky dare, or spend money wisely, or avoid teasing bears and lions, or keep a well-stocked emergency kit. Make a short video about how somebody’s prudence pays off when strange challenges occur.

Pro tip: Writers now use the word prudence to talk about showing good sense or “common sense,” mixed with a little insight and planning. Prudence originally meant the ability to see what is right and good.

7. Naïveté (noun) – lack of experience or judgment

Thought Starter: Imagine a young innocent country person coming to the big city for the first time. His naïveté might make him pay too much for cheap trinkets, or trust a con artist, or rely on bad directions and get terribly lost. Make a short video that shows someone who gains street smarts, and loses naïveté.

Pro tip: Writers often use naïveté to talk about a lack of experience they find slightly charming or forgivable. Naïveté is a gentle word for talking about poor judgment or gullibility, and it emphasizes the basic goodness of the naïve person.

8. Discretion (noun) – good judgment

Thought Starter: Who would you trust in a sticky situation, when your good reputation is at stake? You can count on a person of discretion to make careful decisions, avoid dishonor, and keep your secrets. Make a short video about a time you relied on another’s discretion.

Pro tip: Writers use discretion to mean a kind of good judgment that is very sensitive to social rules. Discretion helps you steer clear of embarrassment. It isn’t eye-catching or proudly heroic, but quiet and steady.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • October 27, 2014 – Contest opens
  • December 8, 2014 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • December 22, 2014 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • On or around January 25, 2014 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

In this contest we will be offering one adult grand prize, one youth grand prize, six finalist prizes, and one viewers choice prizes. All prizes amounts are in USD where applicable.

Additional Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

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