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Fun and Games Vocabulary Video Contest

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days left

Contest ended

Monday Mar 23, 2015

$1000

Grand Prize

$200

Word Winners

Grand Prize

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Smile VS lead pipe.

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Confusion coming ...

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Beneficial What!?

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"Follies"

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Definition: Fancies

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Vocab Entry: Idle...

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Project ed - dive...


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Work Diversion

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Super Speed (Fanc...

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A Boy's Fancies

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Grumpy Baby: Disa...

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Beneficial

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Diversion

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The gym is very B...

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Diversion from task

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ProjectEd Contest...

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Glenn's Many Fancies

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Money Fight- Friv...

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Pizza for Dinner

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Understanding Fan...

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"Idleness"

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"Frivolous" by do...

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DIVERSION

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Morgan's Distract...

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A Diversion Can B...

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The Monkey's Dive...

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A Prom Diversion

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Frivolous Homework

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Idleness

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Affable

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The Genie of Dive...

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Frivolous

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Delightful Diversion

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"Diversion" By Ka...

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Diversion: What d...

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Foster's Home For...

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Diversion Defined

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Unique Beneficial...

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Diversion

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Folly on Ice

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Definition: Frivo...

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Fancies

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A disarming husband

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Call Me Foolish

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Stormy's Idleness

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Frivolous Zen Gar...

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Beneficial Project

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Definition: Benef...

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Definition: Affable

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Fancies

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Idleness short

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Disarming

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Too Idle for a Title

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Projected - Fun a...

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Fun and Games: Be...

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Frolic through th...

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Spelling Bee

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You Need a Diversion

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Frivolous Librarian

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Fancies

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Magic The Frivolo...

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Benefical Meaning

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Idleness

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Frivolous (Adject...

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Imaginary Friends...

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Mr. Fury's Word o...

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A Charm to Disarm

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Fun and Games: Di...

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Frivolous Love

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MOVE!

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A Wizarding Diver...

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Robbie's Diversion

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The Idle Conscience

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Define: Diversion

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Fun and Games

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Project Ed - Dive...

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Definition: Idlen...

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Vocab word project

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Diversion - onlin...

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FOLLIES

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The Hardest Worki...

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contest

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cotni eye joe

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Jeff ruined lunch...

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A Pet for the Wor...

Is there such a thing as having too much fun? Probably not! Even hard workers need a break from time to time. Laughing, dreaming, and indulging in mindless activities can actually be good for you!

Look at the eight words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief to craft a story that conveys the word’s definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you chose. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these eight words: frivolous, diversion, idleness, fancies, disarming, follies, affable, and beneficial.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word or phrase, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word or phrase, its part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

1. Frivolous (adjective) – pointless

Thought starter: Not everything in life serves a purpose. If you’ve ever done something just for fun, or gotten mad at someone for no significant reason, you indulged in a frivolous act. Writers use the word frivolous to describe something that is silly or pointless. Make a video of two people deciding to take part in frivolous activities instead of working hard.

Pro-tip: Writers use frivolous to describe things that are unnecessary and lack value. Some people think that spending hours reading gossip magazines just because it brings you pleasure is frivolous.

2. Diversion (noun) – entertainment, pastime

Thought starter: At some point, we all need a break from thinking. A diversion, like playing a game or doodling, can be a great distraction. Writers use the word diversion to describe a fun event that diverts or turns one’s attention from more serious things. Make a video of someone who stops working to entertain herself with a diversion.

Pro-tip: Writers use diversion when discussing enjoyable activities that provide relief. Those who love cooking consider it a diversion from less enjoyable tasks.

3. Idleness (noun) – lack of activity

Thought starter: Who doesn’t love lazing around on a Sunday afternoon, doing absolutely nothing? In the midst of such idleness, ordering pizza can feel like a chore. Writers use the word idleness to describe periods of inaction or free time. As long as you don’t make a habit of it, short periods of idleness are fine. Make a one-minute video about someone’s idleness after working very hard.

Pro-tip: Writers use idleness to discuss states of inaction or inactivity. A worker might be punished for idleness on the job.

4. Fancies (noun) – products of the imagination

Thought starter: Many great inventions and works of art were once mere fancies. Writers use the word fancies to mean dreamsor products of one’s imagination. If you ever dreamed something up, whether delightful or scary, you too, have had fancies. Make a one-minute video that shows a person describing his many fancies to friends.

Pro-tip: Writers use fancies to describe invented ideas and thoughts. Daydreaming can produce fancies. Someone who imagines things is full of fancies.

5. Disarming (adjective) – charming

Thought starter: Do you know someone who wins people over with his shining personality? Maybe this disarming person showers others with compliments, or puts people at ease with a friendly smile. Writers use the word disarming to mean charmingor attractive. Make a short video of someone who uses his disarming manner to win the favor of a grumpy person.

Pro-tip: Writers use disarming to describe people who are skilled at pleasing others. A disarming individual can delight even the most suspicious or hostile person.

6. Follies (noun) – foolish acts

Thought starter: Do you do silly things? Have you licked the inside of the freezer, or tried to roller skate on ice, just because? Such follies, or bad decisions, can leave you laughing, or hurt. Writers use the word follies to describe especially unwise or foolish actions. Make a video of someone who gets in trouble for his or her follies.

Pro-tip: Writers use follies when talking about senseless or ridiculous actions that are potentially dangerous. Driving too fast on a winding road, or trying to teach your dog to surf, are both follies.

7. Affable (adjective) – friendly

Thought starter: Do you know someone who gets along with everyone she meets? Someone who smiles all time, and strikes up conversations with just about anyone? This affable person probably has a lot of friends. Writers use the word affable to mean friendlyor pleasant. Make a video showing an affable person in an elevator with strangers.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word affable to describe someone who makes friends easily. Someone with an affable personality is approachable and a joy to be around.

8. Beneficial (adjective) – good

Thought starter: Eating vegetables, exercising, and getting a good night’s sleep are all beneficial to your health. The word beneficial means favorableor resulting in good.Make a video of someone doing something beneficial for his or her family or community.


Pro-tip: Writers use the word beneficial to describe things that help and improve situations. Building a new school library is beneficial to the school’s students. Learning to use technology is beneficial in today’s world.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • December 8, 2014 – Contest opens
  • February 2nd, 2015 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • February 16, 2015 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • On or around March 23, 2015 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

In this contest we will be offering one grand prize and seven word winner prizes. All prizes amounts are in USD where applicable.

Additional Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

Project Ed's Creator Resources

Vocabulary Tips

Video Production Tips

Audio Tips

Lighting Tips

Video Compression

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