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Detective Words

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Contest ended

Monday Oct 21, 2013

$1000

Student Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$250

Finalist

Student Grand Prize

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Doggy Exoneration

Adult Grand Prize

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Foresight

Finalist

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"Culpable"

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Sherglop & Botson...

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The Ambiguous Adv...

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Covert


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Detective Merlock...

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Charlie the detec...

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Vocabulary word -...

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Covert: Project E...

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Foresight

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Detective Word: A...

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Ambiguous

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Ambiguous: Projec...

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College Drop Out

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Detective Scrutiny

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The Culpable One(s)

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Culpable

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Scrutiny

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Definition of Exo...

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Ambiguous

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Unicorn Exoneration

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Operation: I'm Hu...

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Exonerate towards...

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That's so Jadon

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The Scrutiny Test

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Exonerate (The Pu...

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Covert

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Mission Briefing

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Agent 456's Cover...

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Scrutiny

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Project ED SCRUTINY

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Exonerate

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Scrutiny

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detective words

Image credit: mstay/iStockphoto.com

Ready to crack the case?

Detectives solve complex problems. They sift through evidence, hunt down the bad guys, protect the people, and prevent crimes. Not bad for a day’s work!

Now it’s your turn. Look at the six words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition and the clues in the brief to craft a story that conveys the definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you’ve chosen. Are you up to the challenge?

1) Scrutiny
A close look

Scrutiny is a noun that means a close examination or observation.

When detectives collect evidence, interrogate a suspect, or explore a crime scene they must use scrutiny. They need to look closely at all of the details. This is not only important for detectives. Doctors use scrutiny when they examine patients and conduct operations. Teachers also use scrutiny when they grade tests. You may use it when you read this contest brief or the directions for a new gadget.

Pro Tip: Scrutiny comes from the Latin word scrutari which means to search or examine.

2) Exonerate
You’re free

Exonerate is a verb that means to clear from blame; to absolve.

Good detectives don’t only hunt down bad guys. They also collect evidence to determine whether or not a person is guilty. If the evidence proves that a suspect was wrongfully accused, this will exonerate her. Although this word is frequently used in the court of law, it is also used in other contexts. Perhaps, for example, you have been accused of cheating in school, but were exonerated when a classmate helped prove your innocence.

Pro Tip: Exonerate comes from the Latin word exonerare, which means to unburden.

3) Ambiguous
It’s a bit unclear.

Ambiguous is an adjective that means unclear in meaning; can be interpreted in different ways.

Sometimes it is difficult to understand the objects, phenomena, and events we observe. In fact, two people may interpret the same thing in different ways! Consider for example, a detective’s mysterious case, an inconclusive scientific experiment, a confusing film, or an abstract work of art. That’s why the word ambiguous is such a crucial element in any writer’s toolbox.

Pro Tip: Ambiguous comes from the Latin word ambigere, which means to be undecided.

4) Foresight
If only I could see the future.

Foresight is a noun that means careful consideration of the future.

Though there is no way to know exactly what will happen in the future, some decisions are made with more consideration future consequences. You might, for example, go to sleep earlier the night before a big test because you know you’ll need the sleep even if you really want to watch your favorite TV show. Foresight is crucial for detectives because it can help prevent crime. It may also prevent you from making some bad decisions like breaking a rule that could land you in detention or eating unhealthy foods that make you sick. Foresight is a handy tool that we often wish we had an even better grasp on.

5) Culpable
Gotcha.

Culpable is an adjective that means deserving blame.

A big part of a detective’s job is figuring out who is guilty. People other than detectives, however, also make frequent use of this word. You may have sought out the family member culpable for eating your slice of pie or the classmate culpable for spreading a vicious rumor. We tend to want to know the person responsible for wrong-doing.

Pro Tip: Culpable comes from the Latin word culpa, which means guilt.

6) Covert
She’s undetected. Secret. Covered Up.

Covert is an adjective that means hidden or undercover.

Writers use covert to describe a crafty spy or detective. There are covert operations within the military and in police departments. This word is THE inspiration for thriller novels and action movies!

Pro Tip: Covert is related to the Middle English, Anglo-French word coverir, which means to cover.

GET STARTED:

  1. READ THE SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS IN THE RULES TAB.
  2. CHECK OUT EXAMPLE SENTENCES AND THOUGHT STARTERS IN THE RESOURCES TAB.
  3. GO CREATE!

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided
  • Display the following as text onscreen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb)
    • The definition of the word
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • August 26, 2013 – Contest opens
  • October 1, 2013 – Contest closes at 12:00 a.m. ET
  • October 21, 2013 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and Engagement: Does your video present educational content in a memorable way; are viewers compelled to watch the video to completion? Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Does your video have high resolution and audio quality? Does it effectively employ visual aesthetics and cinematography? Does it demonstrate production skills?
  • Appropriate content:Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.
  • In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the Under 18 category and one in the Over 18 category. Finalist videos will also receive a prize. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and subject to the applicable district and school policies. Teachers’ prizes may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

Official Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • Your video cannot last more than 1 minute.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any film clips, images, or locations you use.
  • Your video cannot feature ads or monetization. The inclusion of ads or monetization will result in the disqualification of your entry.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the General Terms and Conditions.

Example Sentences:

  • The man stopped eating, and regarded me with the keenest scrutiny and the greatest surprise. – Charles Dickens, Great Expectations
  • Surely, said Rose, ‘the poor child’s story, faithfully repeated to these men, will be sufficient to exonerate him.’ – Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist
  • The suspect, desperate to prove his guilt cried, “If I give you an alibi, will it exonerateme?”
  • As Ms. Shay, the detective, questioned the suspect, he had an ambiguous expression on his face, making it difficult to determine whether or not he was guilty.
  • No foresight can anticipate, nor any document of reasonable length contain, express provisions for all possible questions. – Abraham Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address
  • You have done nothing which you could have avoided — nothing, certainly, which renders you culpable. – Edgar Allen Poe, The Murders in the Rue Morgue
  • The covert detective slipped into the bank undetected and saved the hostages.

Thought Starters for Your Video

  • Create a video about a character with foresight glasses that enable her to see the future.
  • Create a video that showcases what might happen if a person lost his capacity forforesight.
  • Create a news story about a detective’s case.
  • Create a short mystery film with an ambiguous plot twist.

Vocabulary Tips

Video Production Tips

Audio Tips

Lighting Tips

Video Compression

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