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That's Using Your Head Vocabulary Video Contest

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Contest ended

Monday Jun 15, 2015

$1000

Grand Prize

$200

Word Winner

Grand Prize

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Justify having ce...

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The Supposition Song

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Dinner, Tigers, a...

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Would it Hurt?

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Animal Ingenuity

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DELIBERATION

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Thats Using Your ...

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"Infer": A Detect...


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Vocab Entry: Inco...

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I Saw Bigfoot | P...

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A Good Inference

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Amateur Herbalist...

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Black, White and Red

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Cake Gone Wrong

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Justify Cops

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Probable, Bro

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Project Ed- Delib...

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Continuous

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Clarification of ...

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A Serious Discussion

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Marry Me?

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Decided

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The Inconsistent ...

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Inferred

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Interrogation Inc...

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The Robbery

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Tiger News Network

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Cookies!

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The Classroom

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Probable

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Inferred With Hil...

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Supposition

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Stratagems of a B...

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Definition: Justify

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The Missing Brownie

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The War of Troy

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The Inconsistent ...

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Amelia Linett Jus...

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Take Care

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"If History Was D...

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Probability of Dying

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Surprise Birthday...

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March Madness Pro...

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Pizza of Death

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A zombie....really ?

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A Plan to Help

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Interrogation

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The Death of a Lo...

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Inconsistent C's

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Tablet War

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"ProjectED" Suppo...

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Project ED "Incon...

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Stratagems-Attemp...

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Definition: Justify

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You can't JUSTIFY...

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The Detectives Case

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Gossip is Bad

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Investigation Jus...

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Inconsistencies a...

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The Cold Hearted ...

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Connie & Schmied ...

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Skippy's bad day

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Sandwich Showdown

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Stratagem Pablo v...

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Project ED Using ...

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Doomsday Preppers

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Probable

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Judge Tyler: The ...

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Use Your Head Gro...

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Three Strikes

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3-Pointers

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Project Ed Group #2

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Kids Cooking Show

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The Jones Campaign

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The Great Gorilla...

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The Dress Deliber...

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Stratagems

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Stratagems: Usefu...

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Inconsistencies-W...

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Justify my Llama ...

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Stratagem

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Justify

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Project ED contes...

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Inconstant

Do you like swapping ideas with people? A good debate can be very enjoyable. How good are you at winning arguments? Do you have the ability to change people’s minds about things they believe in strongly? These logic and rhetoric words might help you express yourself more clearly!

Look at the eight words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief to craft a story that conveys the word’s definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you’ve chosen. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these eight words or phrases: stratagems, supposition, inconsistencies, justify, deliberation, inferred, probable, and justification.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word or phrase, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word or phrase, its part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

1. Stratagems (noun) – plans

Thought starter: How do you go about accomplishing a goal? Do you make a list, and figure out what the proper order of your actions should be? Plans such as these are called stratagems. Make a video about creating two possible stratagems to solve a difficult problem.

Pro-tip: Writers use the noun stratagems to describe tactics used to achieve a goal. The campaign manager’s stratagems for winning the election were quite clever.

2. Supposition (noun) – guess

Thought starter: It’s natural to draw our own conclusions, even before we have all the facts. This is called making a supposition. Create a video about someone whose false supposition has hilarious consequences.

Pro-tip: Writers use the noun supposition when referring to a belief that has not been completely proven. Based on an inaccurate supposition, she made a terrible mistake. A jury should not come to a verdict based on supposition, but fact.

3. Inconsistencies (noun) – contradictions

Thought starter: Have you ever heard someone saying two seemingly opposite things? If so, you are familiar with inconsistencies. A person who speaks in inconsistencies can be very frustrating to reason with! Make a video showing someone making a speech that is full of inconsistencies.

Pro-tip: Writers use the noun inconsistencies when referring to ideas, statements, or features of a situation that do not agree with each other. The inconsistencies between the boy’s words and his actions made it impossible to take him seriously.

4. Justify (verb) – give good reason

Thought starter: Have you ever been in a situation where you had to justify, or explain, why you did something? Did your version of events clearly justify your actions? Make a video about someone who must justify a difficult decision they’ve made.

Pro-tip: Writers use the verb justify when talking about the action of explaining the reasons behind an action. He tried to justify why he ate the entire pie, but he didn’t have a good reason. Some people say the ends justify the means; others believe this is a dangerous way to think.

5. Deliberation (noun) – discussion

Thought starter: A jury must undergo careful deliberation before coming to a final verdict. Can you think of a time in your own life that required intense deliberation, or thoughtful talk? Make a video about a group of friends engaging in deliberation about something important to them.

Pro-tip: Writers use the noun deliberation when referring to the process of carefully talking out a decision. After hours of deliberation, the student council finally agreed on how to spend their budget.

6. Inferred (verb) – guessed something based on evidence

Thought starter: Have you ever looked at a cloudy sky and thought it would rain? If so, you inferred there would be rainy weather because of the cloud cover. Create a video about someone who inferred a conclusion based on available clues.

Pro-tip: Writers use the verb inferred when talking about the action of making a guess that is informed by available facts. We inferred the waves would be intense because it was windy. Scientists have inferred there are countless star systems, even though most are not visible to human eyes.

7. Probable (adjective) – believable

Thought starter: Have you ever played a game where it was probable, or likely, that your team would win? Your victory might have so obvious that the spectators knew it was probable long before the game was over. Make a video about someone guessing the probable outcome to a situation.

Pro-tip: Writers use the adjective probable to describe things that are likely. Police may search a residence if they have probable cause that a crime was committed. Based on the polls, it’s probable that the newcomer to the race will win the election.

8. Justification (noun) – explanation

Thought starter: Are you fascinated with the reasoning behind people’s actions? If so, you enjoy hearing the justification of an action. Make a video showing someone offering a laughable justification of why she did something she knew was wrong.


Pro-tip: Writers use the noun justification when referring to the reasoning behind an action. The mayor’s justification for wanting to build more affordable public housing made a lot of sense. I didn’t trust her opinion because she couldn’t give any justification for why she believed it.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • January 12, 2015 – Contest opens
  • February 23rd, 2015 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • March 9, 2015 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • On or around April 12, 2015 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

In this contest we will be offering one grand prize and five word winner prizes. All prizes amounts are in USD where applicable.

Additional Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

Project Ed's Creator Resources

Vocabulary Tips

Video Production Tips

Audio Tips

Lighting Tips

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